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    What Would Our Grandparents Say?

    April 23, 2015 •  no comments.

     •  Blog, News

    We receive letters from parents from around the country and around the world.  Some express gratitude, some grief, some share stories of hope, some share stories of heartache.

    When we received this letter to our founder, we felt it was a powerful one to share.  What would our grandparents say?

    “Dear Robyn,
    I just wanted to thank you from the bottom of my heart for your work. My little Ginny was born the day after Christmas in 2012. At 3 months she developed severe eczema due to a dairy allergy. I stopped nursing because my dairy free diet didn’t seem to help her skin issues. She eventually ended up on Neocate. As we slowly introduced new foods she was doing very well until I decided to try hummus on the New Years Day after her first birthday. She went into anaphylaxis and we rode in the ambulance to the ER while my older daughter stayed with a neighbor until my husband could pick her up. This was by far the scariest day of my life. As we navigated the allergy world and added new allergies (egg, chickpea, lentil, garlic, sesame, peanut) I felt hopeless and powerless. I wanted to know why this was happening and (this seems a bit crazy but) what could we do now to prevent Ginny’s children from having the same issues.

    I started to do just a little reading on the subject and I ran across an article about wheat being doused in roundup and felt dizzy. From there I started doing more research until I ran across your work. Your perspective is very much like mine. This journey started with an allergy in my child but I am also a conservative so writing letters to my Republican congressman about the DARK act that he supports feels strange (my guy is Joe Wilson…. The “You Lie!” fella).

    My granddaddy was an agriculture teacher in south Georgia. When I was a little girl he planted a row of peanuts for me. His town has a peanut festival each year and he was the grand marshal of the parade one year. He passed away at the same time as the festival and I remember that people were wearing peanut tie pins and earrings. My sister bought peanut Christmas ornaments for my mom and for me after he died and every year when I would hang the ornament, I would think of him. Now, when I pull out the ornament I have conflicting feelings. I remember him and how much he loved the farming community and I wonder what he would think of all this. I also look at this ornament as the enemy and something that could harm my child. I wish granddaddy was still around so I could talk to him about all of this.

    I feel sort of silly writing to you but I just had to say thank you. I can’t imagine doing what you do with four children but what you are doing is so very important so thank you, thank you, thank you.”

    Be brave. Courage is contagious.

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