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    At School

    10 Tips for Talking to Your Child's School About Food Allergies

    Written By Daniella Knell for SunButter

    Daniella2Sending your child with food allergies off to school can be overwhelming. Trusting others to keep your kid safe is probably your #1 priority! For me, educating myself and others was the only way I could create a safer learning environment for both my children and their caregivers.

    As food allergy parents, we constantly wonder, “What if something happens?” In my opinion, a more productive question is, “Does the person taking care of my child know what to do if and when something happens?”

    It is all about education.

    That’s the key to making sure that your answer to the above question is, “Yes, my child is in good hands.” When people don’t understand food allergies, they don’t know how to protect people who have them. The first step is educating—educating yourself, educating your child, and educating others. This guide will help you educate those around you most effectively.

    1. Attitude

    To effectively educate others, you will need to partner with your school. Know that your attitude sets the tone. This will make or break how your school will or won’t work with you. If you go in with a steamroller approach with demands, you’re likely to meet resistance. Have you ever heard the saying, “you catch more flies with honey than vinegar?” Approach your school with a positive, understanding attitude and you are more likely to see positive, understanding results!

    2. Resources

    Find Educational Resources YOU Trust. You can direct others to these resources and use them to bolster your position. They will also help you remember that you aren’t alone! Here are links to some of my favorites.

    • FAACT – Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Connection Team FAACT is currently my favorite because I find them the easiest to navigate and LOVE their primary focus on education. TheirSchool Curricula Program offers ready to share presentations for the classrooms, beginning with K thru 3.
    • FARE – Food Allergy Research & Education FARE’s ‘Be A Pal: Protect a Life’ program spotlights Alexander the Elephant and his circle of food allergy friends. I still use portions of this program when presenting to preschool and early elementary school children.
    • KFA – Kids with Food Allergies KFA hasan entirepage dedicated to keeping kids with food allergies safe at schools, including free guides and handouts!

    3. FAAP

    Find a Food Allergy Action Plan (FAAP) YOU Like. Your allergist fills out this form outlining actions to be taken by a caregiver in the instance your child has an allergic reaction while in their care. Here is one place you can start: Children’s Physician Network Food Allergy Action Plan

    4. Management Plan

    Figure out WHAT KIND of Management Plan Your Child Will Need. IHP? IEP? Or 504? If your child has life threatening food allergies, they may be considered as a qualified student with disabilities under the Americans with Disability Act (ACT) Amendments Act of 2008.Section 504 of the Rehabilitation ACT of 1973 requires that the school district to provide a “free and appropriate education” (FAPE). Then again, this will depend on whether they are attending a school receiving ANY federal funding, and laws can vary from state to state. DON’T be overwhelmed! Your allergist can help you out!

    The following links will offer your more information regarding 504 Plans, IEPs and IHPs.
    FAACT 504 Plans
    FAACT Individualized Education Plans (IEPs)
    FAACT Individualized Health Plans (IHPs)

    5. Gather Resources

    Find some books and videos you like. My favorites include: the ENTIRE No Biggie Bunchseries, The BugabeesThe Princess and the Peanut, and the Alexander the Elephant Who Couldn’t Eat Peanuts – Gets a Babysitter

    6. Create a School Food Allergy Binder

    Put together useful Resources and have a copy available to share with the nurse and teacher. I would also include some kind of handy labels you can use to mark ‘SAFE’ snacks or a snack box for your child. Any kind of label will work. Here’s an example of the ones I personally designed: S.A.F.E. Food Allergy Labels.

    7. Flyers

    Find samples of food allergy flyers on line which you like. Just type in ‘peanut free’, ‘allergy free’ pics in your favorite search engine and you will find ALL kinds of different flyers you can use. Have these different options available to share with school personnel.

    8. Meet with People

    Meet with the Principal. Meet with school nurse. Meet with your child’s teacher. This is your opportunity to meet with everyone and explain your concerns. Let the individuals know you’re wanting to partner with the school to create a SAFE and enjoyable learning environment for everyone. It will be at this time you will find out what previous experiences these individuals have had in managing food allergies. You may be pleasantly surprised. You may be disappointed. Most importantly, you will be prepared to decide what direction you need to go in moving forward with your school.

    9. Have Your Child Meet with ALL of the People They Will Meet

    This is the opportunity to show your child all the individuals around them whom are working to keep them SAFE. Don’t underestimate the NEED for your child to need to feel this comfort. They don’t WANT to feel singled out, but they also need to feel SAFE.

    10. Get Involved!

    Set up a time to go in and read stories, show a video, whatever it is you want to do to make learning about food allergies FUN! In the beginning it may be nerve racking.

    Daniella Knell, owner of Smart Allergy~Friendly Education, is mother to two children with food allergies. You can find her displaying her public speaking skills in local schools and hospitals, blogging, and presenting allergy~friendly smoothie videos. For allergy~friendly ideas for your household, visit Daniella’s website, FacebookLinkedIn and Twitter.

     

    Write a Letter: Give Kids A Healthy School Lunch!

    Do you know that the USDA provides 31 million American children a lunch each day? But due to a lack of resources, the USDA is only able to provide the cheapest, most processed foods for our kids? To help bring healthier foods to the lunchroom, you can write a letter. Learn more!

    Make your own Snack Packs (and get your kids to help!)

    Step 1: Tell your kids why you’re not buying the prepackaged versions anymore: too many chemicals and you love your kids too much to feed them that.

    Step 2: Get creative and make your own snack packs. Enlist the help of your kids. I tried to mix four healthy choices into the bag, making the fifth one the bonus feature! For example: 1) raisins, 2) nuts (if you can swing it in an allergy-free house), 3) some pretzels, 4) some little crackers (from a box with a short list of ingredients that you can pronounce) and for 5) maybe a chocolate chip or two (or if you’re like me and hate throwing out food, you may want to use up the candy-coated cereal here or the M&Ms you still have or the yogurt raisins that you didn’t realize were coated in rBGH-laden dairy).

    Step 3: Make a dozen or so little bags—with your little ones helping—and stash them for the week. Done! Quick, easy, and no chemicals. Give yourself a hug!

    From Chips to Dips

    Our kids loved chips and in our culture, its pretty hard depriving them of such an American staple! But why should they be crunching those fluorescent orange deep-fried chemical compounds every day after school when kids around the world have been protected from those chemical creations?

    Now we occasionally have a bag of chips as a special treat, but kids can dip crackers, rice crackers, or pretzels into ketchup, mustard, yogurt, or honey. Sure, there are chemicals in their dips, too, but far fewer than if they scarfed down a bag of chips. Remember, it’s not a perfect world—but it can be a better one! And as we move forward, we can also dream of the day that they ask for carrots and celery sticks to crunch on instead of chips!

    Swimming in a Sea of Goldfish

    Step 1: Replace the multi-colored goldfish (you know, the green, red and orange ones!) with the bright orange goldfish
    Step 2: Replace the orange goldfish with the uncolored version or pretzel versions